$214 M CDC Lab Can’t Contain its Germs / CNN and USAToday



One CDC high-containment lab (BSL-3, the level of containment required to study anthrax) fails to contain air efflux.  And it was discovered because visitors touring the facility saw a puff of air exit through a slot in a door window.  How long had this been going on?  
USAToday points out that the BSL-3 lab doors aren’t always locked, either.

… Ebright, of Rutgers University, expressed concern about the repeated issues revealed in news reports about Building 18 since the $214 million building opened in 2005, including articles in 2007 about backup generators that failed to keep airflow systems working during a power outage, and in 2008 about a high-containment lab door that the CDC sealed with duct tape after an incident where an airflow system malfunctioned and sent potentially contaminated air into a “clean” corridor… 

CNN has the first story:

It’s
a highly secured, sophisticated research lab studying deadly diseases such as
bird flu, monkeypox, tuberculosis and rabies.

It’s
in a facility called Building 18, which cost taxpayers $214 million.

And
now, the Biosafety Level 3 lab at the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention in Atlanta is also the subject of a congressional investigation
after a potentially dangerous airflow leak at that lab, CNN has learned.

The leak
occurred on February 16, when air flowed the wrong way out of a germ lab into a
clean-air corridor, rather than through the powerful HEPA filter that cleans
the air, congressional sources and CDC officials said. Visitors touring the
facility were in the clean corridor when they observed a puff of air being
pushed out from the lab through a slot in a door window.

The leak
occurred on February 16, when air flowed the wrong way out of a germ lab into a
clean-air corridor, rather than through the powerful HEPA filter that cleans
the air, congressional sources and CDC officials said. Visitors touring the
facility were in the clean corridor when they observed a puff of air being
pushed out from the lab through a slot in a door window… 

In
2008, it was discovered that a high-containment lab door was sealed with duct
tape. That incident was first reported by the Atlanta Journal-Constitution and
confirmed to CNN by Skinner.



Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Scroll to Top