What are world leaders proposing to do about NSA snooping at this point? / Guardian, CNN

From the Guardian:

[A new NSA document revealed in Germany’s Bild newspaper said there was a] “… not legally registered spying branch” (illegal under German law) in the US embassy in Berlin, the exposure of which would lead to “grave damage for the relations of the United States to another government”.

From the Washington Post:

Interior Minister Hans-Peter Friedrich was quoted Sunday as telling newspaper Bild am Sonntag he wants “complete information on all accusations” and that “if the Americans intercepted cellphones in Germany, they broke German law on German soil.” He added wiretapping is a crime and “those responsible must be held accountable.” 

Back to the Guardian

From there, NSA and CIA staff were tapping communication in Berlin’s government district with high-tech surveillance. Quoting a secret document from 2010, Der Spiegel said such branches existed in about 80 locations around the world, including Paris, Madrid, Rome, Prague, Geneva and Frankfurt…

Germany and Brazil are spearheading efforts at the UN to protect the privacy of electronic communications. Diplomats from the two countries, which have both been targeted by the NSA, are leading efforts by a coalition of nations to draft a UN general assembly resolution calling for the right to privacy on the internet. Although non-binding, the resolution would be one of the strongest condemnations of US snooping to date.

“This resolution will probably have enormous support in the GA [general assembly] since no one likes the NSA spying on them,” a western diplomat told Reuters on condition of anonymity… The Associated Press quoted a diplomat who said the language of the resolution would not be “offensive” to any nation, particularly the US. He added that it would expand the right to privacy guaranteed by the international covenant on civil and political rights, which went into force in 1976.

The draft would be sent next week to the general assembly subcommittee on social, humanitarian, cultural and human rights issues, and be put to the full general assembly in late November.

Germany and France demanded on Thursday that the Americans agree to new transatlantic rules on intelligence and security service behaviour by the end of the year. Merkel added that she wanted action from Obama, not just apologetic words.

From CNN:

Viviane Reding, vice president of the European Commission, called for EU nations to commit to adopting a data protection law in light of the recent spying scandals.

“Data protection must apply to everyone — whether we are talking about citizens’ e-mails or Angela Merkel’s mobile phone,” she said. “We now need big European rules to counter big fears of surveillance.

“At the summit today, Europe’s heads of state and government must follow words with action: They should commit to adopting the EU Data Protection Reform by spring 2014. This would be Europe’s declaration of independence. Only then can Europe credibly face the United States.”

From the Guardian:

A delegation of nine MEPs (members of the European parliament) will travel to Washington on Monday for a three-day visit, during which they will press senior US government and intelligence officials for answers on allegations of widespread spying by the US, and explore “possible legal remedies for EU citizens” resulting from the alleged surveillance. 

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